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20130801
20130831
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
a disproportionate impact on young in this country. i came back from a gathering in detroit, young people who are retail, fast food workers, who are demanding the minimum wage be lept forward to catch up with inflation because it's fall een woefully behind. these young people they see themselves as having absolutely nothing to lose in this economy. they're barely hanging on to the edge, working for $7.25. at rooms like rainbow, black, latino, white, asian, i'm sure there were native people in the room as well. the reality is they saw themselves as being on the same team. that team is people who in this economy, despite their brilliance, despite clear leadership potential h been relegated to margin and forced to survive on $7.25, which is something you can't do. i do believe this rising generation, more some than others because they're less tripped up on race, are willing to work together based on the common interest of kitchen table issues. you're seeing it with older people, too. we saw it with white union workers in 2012 throughout the midwest, for instance. so, i think there's reasons to b
, the stench of his blood was in the air. the big march in detroit, the week later. of course, the birmingham monday less than a month later. then kennedy. there was a season of tumultuous uprising in our country and a lot of bloodshed along the way and a lot of fear. >> and that issue of where the vines was coming from and who should fear the violence. i'll talk to you for a moment. i have something i would like us to listen to. on meet the press, roy wilkins being asked about the likelihood that it would be marchers who would riot. let's take a listen. >> mr. wilkins, there are a great many people, as i'm sure you know, that believe it would be impossible to bring more than 100,000 militant negroes into washington without incidence and possibly riot. >> i don't think there will be any rioting. i don't think a hundred thousand people, just assembling, is cause for apprehension about a riot. the city of washington has accommodated much larger crowds and nobody has talked up in advance the possibility of violence. >> so as you just pointed out, all of the violence up to this moment had been ag
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)